Why Do Saint Berdoodles Cost So Much?

Ever heard the saying, “You get what you pay for?” With dog breeding, this could not be more true.  Reputable breeding is expensive.  Reputable breeding is also worth it.

Factors Influencing Puppy Cost:

  • Reputable Breeding
  • Breeding Costs – Supplies, Food, Supplements
  • Time Associated with Reputable Breeding

Let me explain.  

You decide you want a puppy.  You begin your search online.  Most likely, one of the most deciding factors is PRICE.  How much does the puppy cost?  If it doesn’t fit the budget, the puppy isn’t coming home with you.

Let’s say you decide you want a Saint Berdoodle puppy.  You begin your search.  First of all, finding a Saint Berdoodle can be tough.  When you do find one, you see a few prices.  The lower end is likely around $1500.  The upper end is likely around $3000 plus. 

$1500 sounds better.  But what goes into that $1500 puppy?  Why is one puppy priced at $1500 and one priced at $3000?  They are both Saint Berdoodles.  Why wouldn’t you buy the $1500 puppy?

(Disclaimer: Just because a puppy is less money, does not mean it came from subpar breeding. It may mean that the breeder is willing to part for puppies for less.  Or, it may mean the breeder is having difficulty selling a litter.)

What Goes Into Our Puppies:

  1. Lots of LOVE.  
  2. Quality Supplies
  3. Quality Food
  4. TIME

    Love

    We take care of our mommas, our daddies, and our babies.  We love them as our family, and most of them come home with us at night.

    Quality Supplies

    Numerous supplies are needed to ensure a safe delivery of the puppies.  We keep Oral Cal on hand to ensure labor progresses as necessary and to ensure momma doesn’t have a dangerous drop in calcium when her milk comes in.  In addition, we stock whelping pads, towels, clamps, scissors, cleaning supplies, gloves, heating pads, heating lamps, kennels, and more.

    Quality Food

    We feed on a regular basis Purina Pro Plan to all of our dogs.  

    Once a momma dog delivers, we immediately start her on quality puppy food.  We choose to use Royal Canin Large Breed puppy.  In addition to her dry puppy food, we add Puppy Gold formula, chicken broth, cream of chicken soup, sunflower lecithin powder, vitamin supplements, and calcium supplements to her food at each meal.  

    Our puppies nurse with their mother for at least the first 3 weeks of life.  At 3 weeks, if ready, puppies begin to transition to mush.  We use Puppy Gold and Royal Canin Large Breed puppy dry food.  Blended together, it creates a powerful blend of nutrients for these growing babies.  Around 5-6 weeks, puppies transition to all dry Royal Canin Large Breed puppy dry food.

    Each puppy is watched carefully to ensure he or she is ready for dry food.

    Time

    Perhaps the most underestimated part of reputable breeding is the time commitment.  We spend several nights before labor and one week after delivery of the puppies with the momma dog and her babies. 

    We have a suite set up at the business with a bed, shelving, microwave, food processor and more to ensure both the humans and the dogs and puppies are well taken care of.

    We have a webcam set up for 24 hour audio and video access to ensure both mom and puppies are okay.  We watch for any possibility of mom (being a large breed) rolling onto a puppy.  We ensure all puppies are latching and nursing well.

    We weigh puppies up to twice daily to ensure adequate weight gain.  We supplement puppies with quality formula if needed and give extra nutrient support when needed.  Ever heard of a fading puppy?  It happens frequently, and if not watched closely, can end tragically.

    Balancing heat for the puppies with the coolness needed for a large breed momma takes precision and time.  It takes fans strategically placed, as well as heating pad and lamps strategically placed.

    Breeding Practices that Say RUN THE OTHER WAY

    As a dog business owner, we have had the opportunity to peer into the world of a few other breeders.  Breeders occasionally approach us to sell their puppies for them.  We have yet to agree to this, as we have not had a breeder YET that meets our standards.

    Things to Watch Out For, Red Flags:

    • The breeder won’t show you where the puppies are.  You’ve never seen pictures or videos of the whelping area/breeding area/living quarters.
    • You’ve never seen pictures or videos of the mother and father of the puppies.

    It can be very normal to not actually see the mother and father in person.  For us, Waffles is very protective of her puppies.  It’s actually quite safer if she isn’t around when you’re looking at her babies.

    Beau, on the other hand, is fine for you to look at, IF you can catch a glimpse of him. He’s very shy and timid, and usually runs the other way! 

    • The breeder cannot give you a clear picture of the puppy’s lineage.

    If the breeder can’t give you details about mom and dad, chances are they are unsure themselves.  This is a red flag.  This signals a puppy mill at times.  You want to ensure there is no inbreeding occurring.

     

    Ultimately, it is your decision.  Reputable breeders spend thousands of dollars and hours of time to breed healthy, quality puppies.  We desire to ensure our puppies go to homes where they will be loved, nurtured, cared for, and are at homes with a means of caring for them financially.   

    The cost of the puppy is not the end of the money you will spend.  There will be veterinary care, grooming costs, and supplies for home that will be necessary for your new furry friend.  

    Puppies can be expensive.  Make sure you are prepared before embarking on the journey.  If you have any questions at all, please feel free to reach out any time.